Egyptology and Egyptian Art and Archaeology

PhD candidate preparation requires three or four years of course work, depending on the entering student’s background in Egyptian language.

Students may pursue either a program with a concentration in philology or art and archaeology. Regardless of which concentration is chosen, study of the various stages of the Egyptian language is essential. Since a proper appreciation of Egyptian civilization must be based on a familiarity with both the textual and material remains, the students in both programs are strongly encouraged to acquire a broad background in language, art, and archaeology.

The chief difference between the two programs is in the minor field, which, in the case of an Egyptology program, must include a second Near Eastern language. In the Art and Archaeology program, the minor field may, alternatively, be the archaeology and history of another old world ancient civilization, e.g., Near Eastern or Classical. Such a minor should also include courses in anthropology, materials science, or other departments.

Courses offered on a rotating schedule and required of students of Egyptian civilization:

  • Seminar in Near Eastern History (3 year courses)
  • Elementary Egyptian (or equivalent from elsewhere) (year course)
  • Old Egyptian (one semester)
  • Middle Egyptian Texts (year course)
  • Hieratic (one semester)
  • Late Egyptian (one semester)
  • Ptolemaic (one semester; required for Egyptology program)
  • Demotic (year course; required for Egyptology program)
  • Coptic (year course)
  • Egyptian Art of the Old through Middle Kingdoms
  • Egyptian Art of the New Kingdom
  • Egyptian Art of the Third Intermediate Period and Late Period
  • Egyptian Art of the Ptolemaic and Roman Periods
  • Seminar in Egyptian Art and Archaeology
  • Seminar in Historical Research

Prospective students will find French and German to be essential tools of Egyptological research, and are encouraged to learn those languages as undergraduates.

Those interested in Late Period Egypt are further advised to acquire a reading knowledge of ancient Greek, although this is not a prerequisite for admission to the graduate program. Art and Archaeology majors are required to do either archaeological fieldwork or a museum internship during their residency years.

Sample Curriculum

Egyptology Art and Archaeology
Year 1
Elementary Egyptian
Seminar in Near Eastern History
Egyptian Art (two periods)
Minor field language
Elementary Egyptian
Seminar in Near Eastern History
Egyptian Art (two periods)
Minor field
Seminar in art and archaeology
Year 2
Seminar in Near Eastern History
Middle Egyptian Texts
Old Egyptian
Egyptian Art (two periods)
Minor field language
Hieratic (one semester)
Seminar in Near Eastern History
Middle Egyptian Texts
Old Egyptian
Egyptian Art (two periods)
Minor field
Hieratic (one semester)
Year 3
Seminar in Near Eastern History
Late Egyptian
Coptic
Egyptian Art
Minor field language
Seminar in Near Eastern History
Late Egyptian
Coptic
Egyptian Art
Minor field
Year 4 (Not Required)
Demotic (year course)
Seminar in historical research
Seminar in art and archaeology
Readings and research
Seminar in historical research
Readings and research

A student may complete the curriculum in three years if she or he has had at least one year of Egyptian language before entering.