Undergraduate Courses

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Introduction to Middle Egyptian
AS.130.400 (01)

Introduction to the grammar and writing system of the classical language of the Egyptian Middle Kingdom (ca. 2055-1650 B.C.). In the second semester, literary texts and royal inscriptions will be read. Course meets with AS.133.600.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: MSE Library Eisenberg
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): AFRS-DIASPO

Myths and Monsters in Mesopotamia
AS.130.123 (01)

This course is an introduction to the religion of ancient Mesopotamia (3000-500 BC) through its myths and legends. We will approach Mesopotamian religion through both the textual and archaeological record. Although the focus will be on the myths and legends of Mesopotamia, we will also discuss rituals, magic, and household religion. By the end of this course, students should be familiar with the chief deities of the Mesopotamian pantheon, important texts pertaining to these deities, and the material culture of Mesopotamian religion.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Chapin, Michael A
  • Room: Gilman 219
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-HISCUL

"Egyptomania": A Consumer's Guide to Ancient Egypt
AS.130.149 (01)

Chances are you’ve heard of Cleopatra and the curse of King Tut’s tomb. You may have even met a mummy or two, whether in the flesh or on the silver screen. Even today, 5,000 years after the dawn of Egyptian civilization—and half-way around the globe—the land of the pharaohs continues to fascinate the Western world. But, how is it that ancient Egypt came to be so deeply entrenched in Western culture? This course considers the history of Western interaction with ancient Egypt and examines the consequences of laying claim to a culture that is not one’s own. We will approach our study through the lens of consumption, both material and cultural, situating these phenomena within their historical and contemporary contexts. By engaging with both primary and secondary sources, we will consider the power relations embedded in Egyptian archaeology and the writing of history as well as the ethics of collecting and displaying ancient Egyptian material culture. We will also investigate the popularization of ancient Egypt known as “Egyptomania,” focusing on the commoditization of ancient Egyptian culture in Western media and merchandise. By the end of the class, students will be able to engage with the complex, yet fundamental, question of who owns culture and what is at stake when we uncritically consume an image of the past.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Swaney, Margaret Mary
  • Room: Gilman 400
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/18
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-HISCUL

History of the Jews in Modern Times, from the Middle Ages to 1917
AS.130.216 (01)

A broad survey of the significant political and cultural dynamics of Jewish history in the Medieval, Early-Modern, and Modern Eras.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Katz, David
  • Room: Smokler Center Library
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Freshman Seminar: The Art of War and Peace in Ancient Mesopotamia
AS.130.129 (01)

Ancient Mesopotamia, modern-day Iraq, Syria, and Iran, is the “cradle of civilization.” It witnessed new inventions previously unknown to the ancient world: urban cities, writing systems, kingship, and empires. This course examines the close relationship between war and peace and art in ancient Mesopotamia (ancient Sumer, Babylonia, and Assyria) from 3500 to 539 BCE. During the semester students will be introduced to the art, architecture, and archaeology of ancient Mesopotamia. This course is aimed at students without a previous background in art historical or archaeological approaches to Mesopotamia, but more advanced students are welcome.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Taylor, Avary Kathryn
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 19/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Stone and the Thread
AS.010.389 (01)

Advanced inquiry into imperial Inka architecture and fiber arts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Deleonardis, Lisa
  • Room: Gilman 119
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC

Freshman Seminar: Reading Ancient Middle Eastern Literature
AS.130.107 (01)

The Middle East is home to some of the world’s earliest and most important literature, such as the Epic of Gilgamesh and “Enuma Elish,” the Babylonian Creation Epic. In this introductory course, students will read in translation a selection of literary texts from different cultures that flourished in the Middle East from about 2000 BC-AD 500. As we read, we will consider how we should approach texts that are so chronologically and geographically distant from our own present moment, and why, despite those distances, ancient Middle Eastern literature may be more relevant to us today than ever before.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Lauinger, Jacob
  • Room: Smokler Center Library
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/12
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-HISCUL

The Archaeology of Animals: An Introduction to Zooarchaeology
AS.130.244 (01)

This course is intended to introduce students to the discipline of zooarchaeology, the study of animal remains from archaeological sites. Humans have long depended on their animal counterparts not only for nutritional value, but for their economic, symbolic, and social value, making the study of animals in the human past deeply revealing of the entangled worlds that humans and animals lived in together. In service of this investigation, zooarchaeology, or the study of animal remains from archaeological sites, has developed interdisciplinary techniques in order to address archaeological questions. Zooarchaeology has the ability to provide insight into ancient human behavior around the world including economic strategies, dietary practices, religious observances, ecological interactions, and more. The course will introduce students to the basics of archaeological investigation and the identification of faunal osteological remains on archaeological sites, as well as some of the basic tools and techniques used to derive meaningful conclusions from primary data. Students will be introduced to the principles of comparative anatomy and the major elements of mammalian, avian, and fish skeletons. Students will also be taught to recognize significant markers for taphonomy, sex, butchery, age, and pathology and how this information is used to generate archaeological knowledge. Supplementary readings that help illustrate the application of these techniques to archaeological interpretation will be provided and discussed in class.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Poolman, Laurel Ames
  • Room: Krieger Laverty
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/18
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-ARTARC

Art of Mesoamerica
AS.010.205 (01)

This course provides a basis for the study of ancient Americas art and architecture and a broad exposure to the issues relevant to its study. Select visual arts within the primary regions of Mexico and Central America will be emphasized. In conjunction with the Baltimore Museum of Art (BMA) and the JHU Archaeological Museum (JHAM), students will participate in on-site study of the collections. Students who have taken AS.010.105 are not eligible to register. This course duplicates AS.010.105.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: Krieger Laverty
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/20
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC

Elementary Biblical Hebrew
AS.130.440 (01)

Introduction to the grammar, vocabulary, and writing system of biblical Hebrew.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: MSE Library Eisenberg
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

GOD 101: The Early History of God - Origin, Character, Practice
AS.134.101 (01)

In a world of big ideas, there is none larger than that of God. Divinity is an ever-present topic for both religious devotees and hard core secularists—for anyone who embraces the humanities or ponders what makes us human. Humans are, for better and worse, homo-religiosus (humans who practice religion) as much as homo-sapiens. But what do we know of God historically? How do we go about reconstructing divinity from ancient texts and archaeology? How do we best walk back in time to understand ancient Middle Eastern cultures that gave birth to notions of the divine that have come down to today’s Judaism, Christianity and Islam? This course looks synthetically at the vast topic of God—exploring questions of historical origin, how God was characterized in literature (mythic warrior, king, parent, judge, holy, compassionate) and how God was represented in iconography, both materially and abstractly. Secondly, how did belief intersect with practice? Using the indow of divinity, this course will peer into the varieties of religion experience, exploring the royal use of religion for power, prestige and control balanced against the intimacy of family and household religion. It will probe priestly prerogatives and cultic status, prophetic challenges to injustice, and the pondering of theodicy by poetic sages.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Lewis, Theodore
  • Room: Gilman 130G
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-HISCUL

Distilling the Ancients: An Anthropological Approach to Alcohol in the Ancient World
AS.130.206 (01)

The consumption of alcohol is one of the oldest known human practices. Almost every culture has some type of mind-altering beverage that influences and shapes many facets of society. This course is a cross-cultural examination of the power and significance of alcohol in the ancient world. From the Neolithic to the Classical symposium to the Egyptian festival, the importance of communal drinking—alcohol or otherwise—is a uniting factor across the ancient world. This class will unpack the impact and significance of alcohol across a wide-range of ancient cultures, and examine what the study of alcohol might reveal about ancient societies. This includes alcohol as medicine, its religious and ritual functions, alcohol as a community unifier (and divider) and identity builder, and its practical and economic uses. Students will apply anthropological and archaeological theories to understand why, how, and to what effect humans drink.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Moroney, Morgan E
  • Room: Latrobe 107
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-ARTARC

Introduction To Archaeology
AS.136.101 (01)

An introduction to archaeology and to archaeological method and theory, exploring how archaeologists excavate, analyze, and interpret ancient remains in order to reconstruct how ancient societies functioned. Specific examples from a variety of archaeological projects in different parts of the world will be used to illustrate techniques and principles discussed.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Schwartz, Glenn M
  • Room: Hodson 210
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 66/80
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Death and Dying in Art, Literature, and Philosophy: Introduction to Medical Humanities
AS.145.101 (01)

This team-taught course offers an interdisciplinary introduction to the university's new concentration in "Medicine, Science, and Humanities." The themes of death, dying, and the treatment of the dead are explored in their changing historical, anthropological, philosophical, literary, art historical and medical dimensions. Open to freshmen, sophomores, and upperclass Medicine, Science, and Humanities majors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Delnero, Paul, Hersch, Michael
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 33/80
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial Analysis
AS.270.205 (01)

The course provides a broad introduction to the principles and practice of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and related tools of Geospatial Analysis. Topics will include history of GIS, GIS data structures, data acquisition and merging, database management, spatial analysis, and GIS applications. In addition, students will get hands-on experience working with GIS software.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Chen, Xin
  • Room: Krieger 108
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/25
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MINOR

Readings - Hebrew Prose
AS.130.442 (01)

Reading of biblical Hebrew prose, especially from the Pentateuch, Joshua, Judges, Samuel, and Kings. Cross-listed with Jewish Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: MSE Library Eisenberg
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.130.400 (01)Introduction to Middle EgyptianTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMStaffMSE Library EisenbergAFRS-DIASPO
AS.130.123 (01)Myths and Monsters in MesopotamiaMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMChapin, Michael AGilman 219NEAS-HISCUL
AS.130.149 (01)"Egyptomania": A Consumer's Guide to Ancient EgyptMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMSwaney, Margaret MaryGilman 400NEAS-HISCUL
AS.130.216 (01)History of the Jews in Modern Times, from the Middle Ages to 1917TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKatz, DavidSmokler Center LibraryINST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.130.129 (01)Freshman Seminar: The Art of War and Peace in Ancient MesopotamiaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMTaylor, Avary Kathryn 
AS.010.389 (01)The Stone and the ThreadTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDeleonardis, LisaGilman 119HART-ANC
AS.130.107 (01)Freshman Seminar: Reading Ancient Middle Eastern LiteratureMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMLauinger, JacobSmokler Center LibraryNEAS-HISCUL
AS.130.244 (01)The Archaeology of Animals: An Introduction to ZooarchaeologyTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMPoolman, Laurel AmesKrieger LavertyNEAS-ARTARC
AS.010.205 (01)Art of MesoamericaMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMStaffKrieger LavertyHART-ANC
AS.130.440 (01)Elementary Biblical HebrewStaffMSE Library Eisenberg
AS.134.101 (01)GOD 101: The Early History of God - Origin, Character, PracticeTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMLewis, TheodoreGilman 130GNEAS-HISCUL
AS.130.206 (01)Distilling the Ancients: An Anthropological Approach to Alcohol in the Ancient WorldTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMMoroney, Morgan ELatrobe 107NEAS-ARTARC
AS.136.101 (01)Introduction To ArchaeologyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMSchwartz, Glenn MHodson 210
AS.145.101 (01)Death and Dying in Art, Literature, and Philosophy: Introduction to Medical HumanitiesTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMDelnero, Paul, Hersch, MichaelRemsen Hall 1
AS.270.205 (01)Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial AnalysisM 1:30PM - 4:00PMChen, XinKrieger 108ENVS-MINOR
AS.130.442 (01)Readings - Hebrew ProseStaffMSE Library Eisenberg