Undergraduate Courses

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another pogram, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

History of Ancient Syria-Palestine
AS.130.301 (01)

A survey of the history of Ancient Syria and Canaan, including Ancient Israel.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshman Seminar: Cleopatra's Egypt
AS.130.111 (01)

Egypt in the time of Cleopatra was a fascinating mix of peoples and cultures. Jews, Greeks, and other ethnic groups lived in this unique landscape along with the native Egyptians. In this class we will consider the rich civilization and complex history of Egypt during the reign of this legendary Queen.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elementary Biblical Hebrew
AS.130.440 (01)

Introduction to the grammar, vocabulary, and writing system of biblical Hebrew.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Egyptian Funerary Arts in the Archaeological Museum
AS.130.334 (01)

This class will aim to cover the production and choice of funerary objects for Egyptian elite tombs in several eras of antiquity: the Middle and New Kingdoms, the Third Intermediate Period, and the Late Periods. Students will work with specific objects after learning generally about them, and they will carry out analyses of materials, pigments, construction methods, and erosion and degradation effects. They will create a virtual exhibition for the Museum's website and present their results for inclusion in the museum cataloguing project.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/9
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Elementary Akkadian
AS.130.381 (01)

An introduction to the paleography, grammar and lexicon of the Akkadian language, and the reading of simpler texts in that language. Co-listed with AS.132.600

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Middle Egyptian
AS.130.400 (01)

Introduction to the grammar and writing system of the classical language of the Egyptian Middle Kingdom (ca. 2055-1650 B.C.). In the second semester, literary texts and royal inscriptions will be read. Course meets with AS.133.600.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 9/10
  • PosTag(s): AFRS-DIASPO

History of the Jews in Modern Times, from the Middle Ages to 1917
AS.130.216 (01)

A broad survey of the significant political and cultural dynamics of Jewish history in the Medieval, Early-Modern, and Modern Eras.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Freshman Seminar - Lower, Later, Farther Away: Roman Art Beyond the Center
AS.010.112 (01)

This course will introduce students to the art of the Roman world through art created by and for the Roman lower classes, art created in late antiquity, and art created in the far provinces of the empire. These topics represent a dramatic shift away from the traditional “center” of the study of Roman art (art created for the wealthy and politically privileged citizens of central Italy between the first century BCE and the first century CE), and are leading to new understanding of marginalized groups in the Roman world.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 12/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Hebrew Bible / Old Testament
AS.130.140 (01)

The Bible is arguably the most read and yet most misinterpreted book of all time, one of the most influential and yet most misapplied work of literature. The Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) is Scripture to Jews and Christians yet also a rich collection of literature w/ numerous literary genres that has been highly influential on secular Western culture. At its core, it is our most important literary source that (when wed with archaeology) helps us to understand the people and culture of Iron Age Israel and Judah. This is an introductory course surveying of the books of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) giving primary attention to the religious ideas they contain and the ancient contexts in which they were composed. Topics include: The Academic Study of Religion, Ancient Creation Accounts, Ancestral Religion, The Exodus and Moses, Covenant, Tribalism and Monarchy, The Ideology of Kingship, Prophecy, Priestly Sources, Psalms, Wisdom Literature, and Apocalyptic Thought.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Art of the Ancient Americas
AS.010.105 (01)

This course provides a basis for the study of ancient Americas art and architecture and a broad exposure to the issues relevant to its study. Select visual arts within the primary regions of Mexico and Central America will be emphasized. In conjunction with the Baltimore Museum of Art (BMA) and the JHU Archaeological Museum (JHAM), students will participate in on-site study of the collections.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/25
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC, ARCH-ARCH

Readings - Hebrew Prose
AS.130.442 (01)

Reading of biblical Hebrew prose, especially from the Pentateuch, Joshua, Judges, Samuel, and Kings. Cross-listed with Jewish Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Seminar in Egyptian Art and Archaeology: Approaching Egyptian Art
AS.133.450 (01)

A seminar-based course requiring that students have had at least one prior course in Egyptian art or archaeology. The course will consider the wide variety of ways that people analyze Egyptian art -- currently and over the last hundred twenty-five years. Art historical, anthropological, semiological, and various other approaches will be evaluated during the term. We will focus on reading authors discussing examples chosen from three millennia of art production. Recommended Course Background: At least one prior course in Egyptian art or archaeology.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/9
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-ARTARC

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial Analysis
AS.270.205 (01)

The course provides a broad introduction to the principles and practice of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and related tools of Geospatial Analysis. Topics will include history of GIS, GIS data structures, data acquisition and merging, database management, spatial analysis, and GIS applications. In addition, students will get hands-on experience working with GIS software.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/25
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SCI, ARCH-RELATE

Introduction To Archaeology
AS.136.101 (01)

An introduction to archaeology and to archaeological method and theory, exploring how archaeologists excavate, analyze, and interpret ancient remains in order to reconstruct how ancient societies functioned. Specific examples from a variety of archaeological projects in different parts of the world will be used to illustrate techniques and principles discussed.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 38/70
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.130.301 (01)History of Ancient Syria-PalestineF 2:00PM - 4:30PMLauinger, JacobGilman 130G
AS.130.111 (01)Freshman Seminar: Cleopatra's EgyptTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMJasnow, RichardGilman 313
AS.130.440 (01)Elementary Biblical HebrewTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMEstrada, Justin EugeneMSE Library D1
AS.130.334 (01)Egyptian Funerary Arts in the Archaeological MuseumTh 2:00PM - 4:30PMBalachandran, Sanchita, Bryan, Betsy MorrellGilman 150AARCH-ARCH
AS.130.381 (01)Elementary AkkadianTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMChapin, Michael AMSE Library D1
AS.130.400 (01)Introduction to Middle EgyptianMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMJasnow, RichardMSE Library D1AFRS-DIASPO
AS.130.216 (01)History of the Jews in Modern Times, from the Middle Ages to 1917TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKatz, DavidSmokler Center 213INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.010.112 (01)Freshman Seminar - Lower, Later, Farther Away: Roman Art Beyond the CenterTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMBevis, Elizabeth AllisonGilman 177
AS.130.140 (01)Hebrew Bible / Old TestamentMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMLewis, TheodoreMaryland 104
AS.010.105 (01)Art of the Ancient AmericasTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDeleonardis, LisaHodson 216HART-ANC, ARCH-ARCH
AS.130.442 (01)Readings - Hebrew ProseTh 12:00PM - 2:30PMEstrada, Justin EugeneGilman 130G
AS.133.450 (01)Seminar in Egyptian Art and Archaeology: Approaching Egyptian ArtM 1:30PM - 4:00PMBryan, Betsy MorrellGilman 130GNEAS-ARTARC
AS.270.205 (01)Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial AnalysisM 1:30PM - 4:00PMChen, XinKrieger 108GECS-SCI, ARCH-RELATE
AS.136.101 (01)Introduction To ArchaeologyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMSchwartz, Glenn MGilman 50ARCH-ARCH

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another pogram, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

History: Ancient Syria-Palestine II
AS.130.302 (01)

A survey of the history of Ancient Syria and Cannan, including ancient Israel. Taught with AS.134.661. Cross-listed with Jewish Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Texts, Tablets, and Tweets: The Sociolinguistics of Writing
AS.130.124 (01)

This course examines the evolution of writing and the relationship between speech and writing in ancient and modern societies. We will examine the ways in which orthography, scripts, and the visual components inherent to written language (e.g., scripts, fonts, emoticons, diacritics etc.) are used to create and/or project certain social identities in these new written spaces. A primary aim of this course is to generate discussion regarding the ways in which writing in all of its forms—at the institutional, group, and individual level, in official documents, in emails, texts, tweets, and graffiti, using standardized and non-standard orthographies, in both regulated and unregulated spaces—can be a social and often political act of identity. The writing assignments for the course will encourage you to consider the ways in which writing can be harnessed to express social identities. You will work as a group to develop your own writing system and present it to the class. This will hone your creative and critical thinking skills and give you practice collaborating on a project. You will also research and conduct an original analysis on a corpus of writing.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 35/45
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-HISCUL

Tombs for the Living
AS.010.398 (01)

Centering on the tomb as the unit of analysis, this course examines the cultural and material aspects of death and funerary ritual. Case studies are drawn from North America, Mesoamerica, and the Andes. Collections study in museums.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/35
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Ancient Medicine
AS.130.119 (01)

A survey of medicine and medical practice in the ancient Near East and, to a lesser extent, the Aegean world. The abundant sources range from magical spells to surprisingly “scientific” treatises and handbooks. Readings are selected from translations of primary sources in the writings of ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Israel, Greece, and Rome. Topics will include the sources of our knowledge; the nature of medical practitioners, medical treatment, and surgery; beliefs about disease and the etiology of illness; concepts of contagion and ritual purity.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 33/100
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-HISCUL

Tutankhamun and His Time
AS.130.205 (01)

The reign of Tutankhamun ended a period of fascinating upheaval in ancient Egypt, when a king attempted to stamp out the traditional gods and introduce monotheism. He changed the art of Egypt radically and built a new city from which to rule. This course covers the second half of the 14th century B.C., including the time of the heretic king Akhenaten, his wife Nefertiti, and his possible son Tutankhamun who ruled over all Egypt as a boy. So many questions still exist about this time and so many surprising ideas have been put forward to explain them. We will pursue as many as we can. Illustrated lectures will combine with group and individual presentations by students, supplemented with videos and online discussions with scholars who study this time period.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 37/50
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-HISCUL, NEAS-ARTARC

History of the Jews in Modern Times, from the Middle Ages to 1917
AS.130.216 (01)

A broad survey of the significant political and cultural dynamics of Jewish history in the Medieval, Early-Modern, and Modern Eras.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/20
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-HISCUL, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

World Prehistory: An Anthropological Perspective
AS.130.177 (01)

How and why did our nomadic hunting and gathering ancestors become farmers? What led agricultural societies to build cities, develop writing, religious institutions, wage war, and trade for exotic goods? This course surveys prehistory and ancient history from the origins of human culture to the emergence civilization. Although prehistory and ancient history yield evidence of tremendous cultural diversity this course emphasizes common elements of past human experience, culture, and culture change. These include the origins of modern humans and their adjustment to a variety of post-ice age environments, shifts from hunting and gathering to agricultural lifeways, and the initial development of the world’s earliest cities and civilizations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/40
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH, GECS-SOCSCI

From Hebrews to Jews: The Development of Jewish Identity in the Ancient World
AS.130.133 (01)

What happened to the ten lost tribes of Israel? Was Abraham Jewish? How far back can Jewish ethnicity be traced using genetic research? These questions and more will be topics of discussion as we explore the development of Jewish identity, beginning with the first evidence of a people called “Israel” in the 13th century BCE and ending with the destruction of the Second Temple in 70 CE. The class will start with a discussion of different types of identity, including ethnic, religious, and cultural identities, as well as how identity can vary between members of the same community. We will also consider how ancient peoples can be studied using textual and archaeological sources. Then we will take a loosely diachronic approach to the development of Jewish identity, from the elusive origins of the Israelites to their existence as a monarchic state under rulers such as King David; from their forced displacement under the Assyrian empire to the Diaspora caused by the Romans. Using primary and secondary source materials, we will assess the key developments in group identity that took place at these times and the factors which influenced them.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/18
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-HISCUL

Babylon: Myth and Reality
AS.010.364 (01)

Babylon – the name resonates even today, from the biblical whore of Revelation to sci-fi. It evokes exotic places and time long past. But what do we really know about the ancient city and the civilization that flourished there thousands of years ago? The first part of this course examines the archaeological city of Babylon, located in the modern state of Iraq, and considers its artistic and architectural achievements in the context of Mesopotamian history. The second part of the class explores the ongoing impact of Babylon in the cultural imagination of later periods, from the Classical and biblical authors, to European artists, Hollywood movies, science fiction, and contemporary political movements.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Freshman Seminar: Investigating Gender and Sexuality in Mesopotamian Art
AS.010.104 (01)

Specifics of gender and sexuality are not universal norms, but rather are the product of particular cultural formations. Works of art are especially critical in shaping and conveying these particularities. This seminar examines how artistic products expressed and constructed gender identities and notions of sexuality in ancient Mesopotamia from the 4th millennium to the Hellenistic period. As a group, we will explore a variety of case studies, through which students will be introduced to ancient Mesopotamian culture and will develop skills in specific research skills such as critical reading, analysis, and interpretation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to the History of Rabbinic Literature
AS.130.346 (01)

Broadly surveying classic rabbinic literature, including the Talmud and its commentaries, the legal codes and the response, this seminar explores the immanent as well as the external factors that shaped the development of this literature, the seminal role of this literature in Jewish self-definition and self-perception, and the role of this literature in pre-modern and modern Jewish culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elementary Biblical Hebrew
AS.130.441 (01)

Survey of grammar and reading of simple texts. (Credit given only on completion of AS.130.440 and AS.130.441). May not be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Archaeological Method and Theory
AS.130.354 (01)

Climate change, population growth, war - what questions do archaeologists ask about the ancient past, how do they collect relevant evidence, and how do they arrive at satisfying answers to their questions? This course will review major theoretical currents in archaeology including evolutionary, cultural-historical, processual and post-processual approaches and discuss the future of archaeology as a scientific and humanistic discipline. Basic techniques for analyzing major categories of artifacts such as lithics, ceramics, archaeobotanical, and zooarchaeological materials will also be introduced.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/10
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Reading Of Hebrew Prose
AS.130.443 (01)

Reading of Biblical Hebrew prose, especially from the Pentateuch, Joshua, Judges, Samuel, and Kings.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elementary Akkadian II
AS.130.383 (01)

An introduction to the paleography, grammar, and lexicon of the Akkadian language, and the reading of simpler texts in that language. Continues AS.130.381

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial Analysis
AS.270.205 (01)

The course provides a broad introduction to the principles and practice of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and related tools of Geospatial Analysis. Topics will include history of GIS, GIS data structures, data acquisition and merging, database management, spatial analysis, and GIS applications. In addition, students will get hands-on experience working with GIS software.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/24
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-RELATE

Introduction To Middle Egyptian
AS.130.401 (01)

Introduction to the grammar and writing system of the classical language of the Egyptian Middle Kingdom (ca. 2011- 1700 B.C.). Co-listed with AS.133.601.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Prophets and Prophecy in the Bible
AS.130.373 (01)

From thundering voices of social justice to apocalyptic visionaries, biblical prophets have been revered by Jews, Christians and Muslims for thousands of years. They have inspired civic leaders such as Martin Luther King Jr. yet also provided fodder for modern charlatans promising a utopian future. Yet who were these individuals (orators? politicians? diviners? poets?) and what was the full range of their message as set against the Realpolitik world of ancient Israel, Iraq, Egypt, Syria and Jordan?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.130.302 (01)History: Ancient Syria-Palestine IITh 2:00PM - 4:30PMMandell, Alice HGilman 130G
AS.130.124 (01)Texts, Tablets, and Tweets: The Sociolinguistics of WritingTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMandell, Alice HGilman 132NEAS-HISCUL
AS.010.398 (01)Tombs for the LivingTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDeleonardis, LisaHodson 305ARCH-ARCH
AS.130.119 (01)Ancient MedicineMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMJasnow, RichardGilman 50NEAS-HISCUL
AS.130.205 (01)Tutankhamun and His TimeTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMBryson, Karen MargaretGilman 132NEAS-HISCUL, NEAS-ARTARC
AS.130.216 (01)History of the Jews in Modern Times, from the Middle Ages to 1917MW 12:00PM - 1:15PMKatz, DavidSmokler Center LibraryNEAS-HISCUL, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.130.177 (01)World Prehistory: An Anthropological PerspectiveTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMHarrower, Michael JamesGilman 17ARCH-ARCH, GECS-SOCSCI
AS.130.133 (01)From Hebrews to Jews: The Development of Jewish Identity in the Ancient WorldTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMLiebermann, Rosanne RuthGilman 400NEAS-HISCUL
AS.010.364 (01)Babylon: Myth and RealityTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMFeldman, MarianGilman 177ARCH-ARCH
AS.010.104 (01)Freshman Seminar: Investigating Gender and Sexuality in Mesopotamian ArtT 1:30PM - 4:00PMFeldman, MarianGilman 177
AS.130.346 (01)Introduction to the History of Rabbinic LiteratureMW 10:30AM - 11:45AMKatz, DavidSmokler Center Library
AS.130.441 (01)Elementary Biblical HebrewTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMEstrada, Justin EugeneMSE Library D1
AS.130.354 (01)Archaeological Method and TheoryTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMHarrower, Michael JamesGilman 186ARCH-ARCH
AS.130.443 (01)Reading Of Hebrew ProseTh 12:00PM - 2:30PMEstrada, Justin EugeneMSE Library D1
AS.130.383 (01)Elementary Akkadian IIT 1:30PM - 4:00PMChapin, Michael A 
AS.270.205 (01)Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial AnalysisMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMKelly, Rebecca EKrieger 108ARCH-RELATE
AS.130.401 (01)Introduction To Middle EgyptianM 1:30PM - 4:00PMJasnow, RichardMSE Library D1
AS.130.373 (01)Prophets and Prophecy in the BibleMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMLewis, TheodoreHodson 216