Undergraduate Courses

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Ancient Near Eastern Civilizations
AS.130.101 (01)

Review of important issues in ancient Near Eastern history and culture from the Neolithic era to the Persian period. Included will be an examination of the Neolithic agricultural revolution, the emergence of cities, states and writing, and formation of empires. Cultures such as Sumer and Akkad, Egypt, the Hittites, Israelites, Assyrians, Babylonians, and Persians will be discussed.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Schwartz, Glenn M
  • Room: Shaffer 301  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 32/45
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Medicine in Ancient Egypt
AS.130.119 (01)

A survey of medicine and medical practice in Egypt and, to a lesser extent, the ancient Near East in general. The abundant sources range from magical spells to surprisingly "scientific" treatises and handbooks. Readings are selected from translations of primary sources in the writings of ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, and Israel. Topics will include the sources of our knowledge; the nature of medical practitioners, medical treatment, and surgery; beliefs about disease and the etiology of illness; concepts of contagion and ritual purity.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Jasnow, Richard
  • Room: BLC 5015  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/48
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Myths and Monsters in Mesopotamia
AS.130.123 (01)

This course is an introduction to the religion of ancient Mesopotamia (3000-500 BC) through its myths and legends. We will approach Mesopotamian religion through both the textual and archaeological record. Although the focus will be on the myths and legends of Mesopotamia, we will also discuss rituals, magic, and household religion. By the end of this course, students should be familiar with the chief deities of the Mesopotamian pantheon, important texts pertaining to these deities, and the material culture of Mesopotamian religion.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Chapin, Michael Arthur
  • Room: Gilman 413  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-HISCUL

Freshman Seminar: The Art of War and Peace in Ancient Mesopotamia
AS.130.129 (01)

Ancient Mesopotamia, modern-day Iraq, Syria, and Iran, is the “cradle of civilization.” It witnessed new inventions previously unknown to the ancient world: urban cities, writing systems, kingship, and empires. This course examines the close relationship between war and peace and art in ancient Mesopotamia (ancient Sumer, Babylonia, and Assyria) from 3500 to 539 BCE. During the semester students will be introduced to the art, architecture, and archaeology of ancient Mesopotamia. This course is aimed at students without a previous background in art historical or archaeological approaches to Mesopotamia, but more advanced students are welcome.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Taylor, Avary Rhys
  • Room: Gilman 130G  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

History of Hasidism
AS.130.136 (01)

Although it appears to be a relic of pre-modern Judaism, Hasidism is a phenomenon of the modern era of Jewish history. This course surveys the political and social history of the Hasidic movement over the course of the last three centuries. Students will also explore basic features of Hasidic culture and thought in their historical development. Cross-listed with Jewish Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Katz, David
  • Room: Smokler Center 214  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshman Seminar: Jerusalem: The Holy City
AS.130.138 (01)

This course will survey the cultural history of Jerusalem over three millennia, primarily as the symbolic focus of three faiths: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The course content will focus on the transformation of sacred space as reflected by literary and archaeological evidence by examining the artifacts, architectural monuments, and iconography in relation to written sources. The creation of mythic Jerusalem through event and experience will be examined. Course requirements will focus on the development of advanced writing skills and critical thinking.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Mandell, Alice H
  • Room: Gilman 130G  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-HISCUL

"Egyptomania": A Consumer's Guide to Ancient Egypt
AS.130.149 (01)

Chances are you’ve heard of Cleopatra and the curse of King Tut’s tomb. You may have even met a mummy or two, whether in the flesh or on the silver screen. Even today, 5,000 years after the dawn of Egyptian civilization—and half-way around the globe—the land of the pharaohs continues to fascinate the Western world. But, how is it that ancient Egypt came to be so deeply entrenched in Western culture? This course considers the history of Western interaction with ancient Egypt and examines the consequences of laying claim to a culture that is not one’s own. We will approach our study through the lens of consumption, both material and cultural, situating these phenomena within their historical and contemporary contexts. By engaging with both primary and secondary sources, we will consider the power relations embedded in Egyptian archaeology and the writing of history as well as the ethics of collecting and displaying ancient Egyptian material culture. We will also investigate the popularization of ancient Egypt known as “Egyptomania,” focusing on the commoditization of ancient Egyptian culture in Western media and merchandise. By the end of the class, students will be able to engage with the complex, yet fundamental, question of who owns culture and what is at stake when we uncritically consume an image of the past.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Swaney, Margaret Mary (Meg)
  • Room: Bloomberg 172  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-HISCUL, ARCH-ARCH

World Prehistory: An Anthropological Perspective
AS.130.177 (01)

How and why did our nomadic hunting and gathering ancestors become farmers? What led agricultural societies to build cities, develop writing, religious institutions, wage war, and trade for exotic goods? This course surveys prehistory and ancient history from the origins of human culture to the emergence civilization. Although prehistory and ancient history yield evidence of tremendous cultural diversity this course emphasizes common elements of past human experience, culture, and culture change. These include the origins of modern humans and their adjustment to a variety of post-ice age environments, shifts from hunting and gathering to agricultural lifeways, and the initial development of the world’s earliest cities and civilizations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Harrower, Michael James
  • Room: Hodson 301  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/25
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Distilling the Ancients: An Anthropological Approach to Alcohol in the Ancient World
AS.130.206 (01)

The consumption of alcohol is one of the oldest known human practices. Almost every culture has some type of mind-altering beverage that influences and shapes many facets of society. This course is a cross-cultural examination of the power and significance of alcohol in the ancient world. From the Neolithic to the Classical symposium to the Egyptian festival, the importance of communal drinking—alcohol or otherwise—is a uniting factor across the ancient world. This class will unpack the impact and significance of alcohol across a wide-range of ancient cultures, and examine what the study of alcohol might reveal about ancient societies. This includes alcohol as medicine, its religious and ritual functions, alcohol as a community unifier (and divider) and identity builder, and its practical and economic uses. Students will apply anthropological and archaeological theories to understand why, how, and to what effect humans drink.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Moroney, Morgan E
  • Room: Gilman 313  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/17
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-ARTARC, ARCH-ARCH, MSCH-HUM

History of the Jews in Pre-Modern Times, from the Middle Ages to 1789
AS.130.216 (01)

A broad survey of the significant political and cultural dynamics of Jewish history in the Medieval, Early-Modern, and Modern Eras.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Katz, David
  • Room: Smokler Center Library  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

From Papyrus to Pixels: The Materiality of Writing from Past to Present
AS.130.222 (01)

For over 5,200 years humans have used writing as a record for political, administrative, social, religious, and scholarly pursuits. Over millennia diverse scripts have been written, inscribed, carved, impressed, and painted on a variety of objects such as papyrus, stone, ivory, clay, leather, wax, rope, paper, metal, bone, wood, and other mediums. Today, the practice of writing has primarily shifted to the digital world. Computers are often the preferred way for people to “write.” In this course students will be invited to critically examine relationships between scribes, craftsmen, writing, and materials. The goal of the course is for students to recognize how writing has shaped religious and political movements, and aided bureaucratic endeavors from the invention of writing around 3200 B.C. to the present day. In the first part of the semester we will explore the emergence of writing in Egypt, Mesopotamia, China, and Mesoamerica. In the second half of the course students will explore how the act of writing transitioned from hand written manuscripts, to printed books, and now digitized texts. We will explore the way that computers and social media have changed the way that people interact with writing. The seminar will include lecture, discussion, museum fieldtrips, and experimental archaeology labs to investigate and engage with the materiality of clay cuneiform tablets, Egyptian papyrus, Roman wax writing boards, and more!

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Shippelhoute, Karlene Dee Ann
  • Room: Gilman 119  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/12
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

The Archaeology of Animals: An Introduction to Zooarchaeology
AS.130.244 (01)

This course is intended to introduce students to the discipline of zooarchaeology, the study of animal remains from archaeological sites. Humans have long depended on their animal counterparts not only for nutritional value, but for their economic, symbolic, and social value, making the study of animals in the human past deeply revealing of the entangled worlds that humans and animals lived in together. In service of this investigation, zooarchaeology, or the study of animal remains from archaeological sites, has developed interdisciplinary techniques in order to address archaeological questions. Zooarchaeology has the ability to provide insight into ancient human behavior around the world including economic strategies, dietary practices, religious observances, ecological interactions, and more. The course will introduce students to the basics of archaeological investigation and the identification of faunal osteological remains on archaeological sites, as well as some of the basic tools and techniques used to derive meaningful conclusions from primary data. Students will be introduced to the principles of comparative anatomy and the major elements of mammalian, avian, and fish skeletons. Students will also be taught to recognize significant markers for taphonomy, sex, butchery, age, and pathology and how this information is used to generate archaeological knowledge. Supplementary readings that help illustrate the application of these techniques to archaeological interpretation will be provided and discussed in class.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Poolman, Laurel Ames
  • Room: Maryland 114  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/19
  • PosTag(s): BEHB-BIOBEH, BEHB-SOCSCI, ARCH-ARCH

History of Ancient Syria-Palestine
AS.130.301 (01)

A survey of the history of Ancient Syria and Canaan, including Ancient Israel.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Lauinger, Jacob
  • Room: Gilman 130G  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Ancient Magic and Ritual
AS.130.376 (01)

This course will introduce students to the vast body of rituals that were practiced and performed in antiquity, with a particular emphasis on rituals from ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, and the Hebrew Bible. In addition to examining rituals from a comparative perspective, anthropological and sociological studies of ritual will be read and discussed to shed light on the social, cultural, and political significance of ritual in the ancient world and beyond.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Delnero, Paul
  • Room: Ames 234  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-RELATE, MSCH-HUM

Creating an Egyptian Temple
AS.130.377 (01)

This class will challenge every participant to plan a temple environment for a particular deity. The readings, lectures, and discussions will cover the mythology around specific gods and how it influenced temple architecture, location, ritual, and festivals. It will survey the history of temple building in Egypt, the role of architecture and art -- particularly wall reliefs -- in communicating the functions of particular parts of temples. The aim is to help students understand what requirements an Egyptian temple needed to fulfill. Then each student will plan a temple for a chosen deity and explain to peers how it meets the ancient requirements.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Bryan, Betsy Morrell
  • Room: Gilman 130G  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/8
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Geoarchaeology: Applications of Earth Science to Archaeology
AS.130.378 (01)

Geoarchaeology is a multidisciplinary subfield that applies the tools and techniques of earth science to understand ancient humans and their interactions with environments. This course examines basic topics and concepts, including archaeological site formation, paleo-environmental reconstruction, raw materials and resources, soil science, deposition and erosion of wind and water-borne sediments in different environments such as along rivers, lakes and coastlines, radiocarbon and other chronometric dating methods, and ground-based remote sensing, including ground penetrating radar.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Harrower, Michael James
  • Room: Gilman 130G  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/10
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Introduction to Middle Egyptian
AS.130.400 (01)

Introduction to the grammar and writing system of the classical language of the Egyptian Middle Kingdom (ca. 2055-1650 B.C.). In the second semester, literary texts and royal inscriptions will be read. Course meets with AS.133.600.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Praet, Maarten
  • Room: Gilman 130G  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/5
  • PosTag(s): AFRS-DIASPO

Elementary Biblical Hebrew
AS.130.440 (01)

Introduction to the grammar, vocabulary, and writing system of biblical Hebrew.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Cooper, Stephanie Lynn
  • Room: MSE Library D1  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Readings - Hebrew Prose
AS.130.442 (01)

Reading of biblical Hebrew prose, especially from the Pentateuch, Joshua, Judges, Samuel, and Kings. Cross-listed with Jewish Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Cooper, Stephanie Lynn
  • Room: MSE Library D1  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Kings and Chronicles
AS.134.410 (01)

This course surveys scholarship on the histories of Israel and Judah as presented in Kings and Chronicles. The course also addresses changes in the Hebrew language in the first millennium BCE.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Mandell, Alice H
  • Room: MSE Library D1  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/3
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial Analysis
AS.270.205 (01)

The course provides a broad introduction to the principles and practice of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and related tools of Geospatial Analysis. Topics will include history of GIS, GIS data structures, data acquisition and merging, database management, spatial analysis, and GIS applications. In addition, students will get hands-on experience working with GIS software.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Chen, Xin
  • Room: Krieger 108  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/24
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MINOR, ARCH-RELATE

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.130.101 (01)Ancient Near Eastern CivilizationsTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMSchwartz, Glenn MShaffer 301
 
ARCH-ARCH
AS.130.119 (01)Medicine in Ancient EgyptMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMJasnow, RichardBLC 5015
 
MSCH-HUM
AS.130.123 (01)Myths and Monsters in MesopotamiaMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMChapin, Michael ArthurGilman 413
 
NEAS-HISCUL
AS.130.129 (01)Freshman Seminar: The Art of War and Peace in Ancient MesopotamiaMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMTaylor, Avary RhysGilman 130G
 
ARCH-ARCH
AS.130.136 (01)History of HasidismTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMKatz, DavidSmokler Center 214
 
AS.130.138 (01)Freshman Seminar: Jerusalem: The Holy CityTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMMandell, Alice HGilman 130G
 
NEAS-HISCUL
AS.130.149 (01)"Egyptomania": A Consumer's Guide to Ancient EgyptTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMSwaney, Margaret Mary (Meg)Bloomberg 172
 
NEAS-HISCUL, ARCH-ARCH
AS.130.177 (01)World Prehistory: An Anthropological PerspectiveTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMHarrower, Michael JamesHodson 301
 
ARCH-ARCH
AS.130.206 (01)Distilling the Ancients: An Anthropological Approach to Alcohol in the Ancient WorldTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMoroney, Morgan EGilman 313
 
NEAS-ARTARC, ARCH-ARCH, MSCH-HUM
AS.130.216 (01)History of the Jews in Pre-Modern Times, from the Middle Ages to 1789TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKatz, DavidSmokler Center Library
 
INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.130.222 (01)From Papyrus to Pixels: The Materiality of Writing from Past to PresentMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMShippelhoute, Karlene Dee AnnGilman 119
 
ARCH-ARCH
AS.130.244 (01)The Archaeology of Animals: An Introduction to ZooarchaeologyMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMPoolman, Laurel AmesMaryland 114
 
BEHB-BIOBEH, BEHB-SOCSCI, ARCH-ARCH
AS.130.301 (01)History of Ancient Syria-PalestineT 1:30PM - 4:00PMLauinger, JacobGilman 130G
 
AS.130.376 (01)Ancient Magic and RitualTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMDelnero, PaulAmes 234
 
ARCH-RELATE, MSCH-HUM
AS.130.377 (01)Creating an Egyptian TempleMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMBryan, Betsy MorrellGilman 130G
 
ARCH-ARCH
AS.130.378 (01)Geoarchaeology: Applications of Earth Science to ArchaeologyTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMHarrower, Michael JamesGilman 130G
 
ARCH-ARCH
AS.130.400 (01)Introduction to Middle EgyptianMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMPraet, MaartenGilman 130G
 
AFRS-DIASPO
AS.130.440 (01)Elementary Biblical HebrewTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMCooper, Stephanie LynnMSE Library D1
 
AS.130.442 (01)Readings - Hebrew ProseW 1:30PM - 4:00PMCooper, Stephanie LynnMSE Library D1
 
AS.134.410 (01)Kings and ChroniclesF 1:30PM - 4:00PMMandell, Alice HMSE Library D1
 
AS.270.205 (01)Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial AnalysisM 1:30PM - 4:00PMChen, XinKrieger 108
 
ENVS-MINOR, ARCH-RELATE