Undergraduate Courses

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Medieval Art and Architecture of the Holy Land
AS.010.319 (01)

The course focuses on art and architecture in the political and religious contexts of the Middle East, from the 4th to the 14th c. The three monotheistic religions all claimed specific territories -- in particular the city of Jerusalem -- for cult practices. This situation resulted in military conflicts that had an impact of Jewish, Medieval, Byzantine, and Islamic art in the Holy Land. The political conflicts, which still plague the region today, are rooted in the complex situation of the medieval period. The Roman, Arab, Byzantine, and crusader invasions resulted however in exciting eclectic styles that characterize the art and architecture of the region. We will discuss concepts behind political and religious leadership, as they intersect with the power of the arts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Zchomelidse, Nino
  • Room: Gilman 177
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/19
  • PosTag(s): ISLM-ISLMST, HART-MED

Jerusalem: The Holy City
AS.130.138 (01)

This course will survey the cultural history of Jerusalem over three millennia, primarily as the symbolic focus of three faiths: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The course content will focus on the transformation of sacred space as reflected by literary and archaeological evidence by examining the artifacts, architectural monuments, and iconography in relation to written sources. The creation of mythic Jerusalem through event and experience will be examined. Course requirements will focus on the development of advanced writing skills and critical thinking.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Mandell, Alice H
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 65/70
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-HISCUL

Conquest, Conversion, and Language Change in the Middle Ages
AS.100.374 (01)

Examines case-studies of imperial conquests (Islamic, Mongol, reconquista, early colonialism) and attendant changes in religion (Christianization; Islamization) and in language (Arabization; transition from Latin to European vernaculars) across medieval Eurasia.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: El-leithy, Tamer
  • Room: Gilman 10
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, ISLM-ISLMST, HIST-MIDEST, HIST-ASIA, HIST-EUROPE

Ancient Near Eastern Civilizations
AS.130.101 (01)

Review of important issues in ancient Near Eastern history and culture from the Neolithic era to the Persian period. Included will be an examination of the Neolithic agricultural revolution, the emergence of cities, states and writing, and formation of empires. Cultures such as Sumer and Akkad, Egypt, the Hittites, Israelites, Assyrians, Babylonians, and Persians will be discussed.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Schwartz, Glenn M
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 70/80
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Hebrew Bible / Old Testament
AS.130.140 (01)

The Bible is arguably the most read and yet most misinterpreted book of all time, one of the most influential and yet most misapplied work of literature. The Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) is Scripture to Jews and Christians yet also a rich collection of literature w/ numerous literary genres that has been highly influential on secular Western culture. At its core, it is our most important literary source that (when wed with archaeology) helps us to understand the people and culture of Iron Age Israel and Judah. This is an introductory course surveying of the books of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) giving primary attention to the religious ideas they contain and the ancient contexts in which they were composed. Topics include: The Academic Study of Religion, Ancient Creation Accounts, Ancestral Religion, The Exodus and Moses, Covenant, Tribalism and Monarchy, The Ideology of Kingship, Prophecy, Priestly Sources, Psalms, Wisdom Literature, and Apocalyptic Thought.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Lewis, Theodore
  • Room: Maryland 202
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshman Seminar: The Development of Useful Things: A Comparative Approach to the Study of Technology and Economy in the Ancient World
AS.130.148 (01)

This archaeology course will provide an overview of technological developments in the ancient world (from the Neolithic period to the beginning of the first millennium CE) and will explore their effects on the organization of economies and societies. Each week we will discuss a technological innovation and assess its impact on the societies that introduced it. This course will focus primarily on developments and case studies from the ancient Near Eastern and eastern Africa. We will depart from this trajectory to engage in relevant comparisons with developments occurring in other areas of the ancient world. Throughout the course, social aspects of technologies will be explored alongside economic aspects. In addition to focusing on the development of technologies as ‘objects’ (stone tools, pottery, metals, etc.), we will study non-material technologies, that arose as solutions to practical problems and have altered the world in important ways (agriculture, animal domestication, writing, etc.). This course approaches past technologies from a number of different perspectives: (1) by learning about particular anthropological and archaeological case studies, (2) by engaging with scholarship focusing on major theoretical and philosophical themes, (3) by engaging with ethnographic research, both in the form of articles and in the form of documentaries, and (4) by means of thought experiments and debates. This course will benefit humanities, social science, and science-oriented students who have an interest in understanding the inner-workings of two important aspects of human societies: technology and economy

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Dumitru, Ioana Andrada
  • Room: Mattin Center 162
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/18
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-ARTARC, ARCH-ARCH

Stargazing and Reading the Future: Science and Magic in Ancient Egypt
AS.130.139 (01)

Is astrology science? Is ancient medicine magic? What is the logic of divination? I invite you to explore the answers with me by traveling back in time to ancient Egypt, a place where knowledge from the ancient Mediterranean world once converged. We will start by bridging the difference between science and magic and establishing the importance of contextualization in cross-culture studies. The topics range from the birth of astronomy, the language and logic of dream books to gynecological texts’ connections with love magic.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Zhang, Lingxin
  • Room: Shaffer 100
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/18
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-HISCUL

Diplomats, Dealers, and Diggers: The Birth of Archaeology and the Rise of Collecting from the 19th c. to Today
AS.010.307 (01)

The development of archaeology in the Middle East – its history of explorers, diplomats, missionaries and gentlemen-scholars – profoundly shaped the modern world, from the creation of new museums and the antiquities market to international relations and terrorism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Feldman, Marian
  • Room: Gilman 119
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/19
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Freshman Seminar - Lower, Later, Farther Away: Roman Art Beyond the Center
AS.010.112 (01)

This course will introduce students to the art of the Roman world through art created by and for the Roman lower classes, art created in late antiquity, and art created in the far provinces of the empire. These topics represent a dramatic shift away from the traditional “center” of the study of Roman art (art created for the wealthy and politically privileged citizens of central Italy between the first century BCE and the first century CE), and are leading to new understanding of marginalized groups in the Roman world.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Bevis, Elizabeth Allison
  • Room: Gilman 208
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

What My Soul Said To Me
AS.130.147 (01)

“What My Soul Said to Me” will be focused on looking at the mortuary culture in Middle Kingdom Egypt through various types of evidence. By looking at the funerary culture of this age, students will learn about the funerary culture of Egypt during this period and will also become more familiar with the Middle Kingdom period in general. More importantly, students will be encouraged to think about larger topics involved in archaeological and historical studies, while using Middle Kingdom period Egypt as a setting to focus those discussions. This course is aimed at students without a previous background in archaeology or Egyptology, but more advanced students are welcome.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Waller, Jill S
  • Room: Gilman 134
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/18
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-ARTARC

History of the Jews in Modern Times, from the Middle Ages to 1917
AS.130.216 (01)

A broad survey of the significant political and cultural dynamics of Jewish history in the Medieval, Early-Modern, and Modern Eras.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Katz, David
  • Room: Smokler Center Library
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/19
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

The Art of War and Peace in Ancient Mesopotamia
AS.130.219 (01)

Ancient Mesopotamia, modern-day Iraq, Syria, and Iran, is the “cradle of civilization.” It witnessed new inventions previously unknown to the ancient world: urban cities, writing systems, kingship, and empires. This course examines the close relationship between war and peace and art in ancient Mesopotamia (ancient Sumer, Babylonia, and Assyria) from 3500 to 539 BCE. During the semester students will be introduced to the art, architecture, and archaeology of ancient Mesopotamia. This course is aimed at students without a previous background in art historical or archaeological approaches to Mesopotamia, but more advanced students are welcome.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Taylor, Avary Kathryn
  • Room: Gilman 277
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-ARTARC, ARCH-ARCH

History of Ancient Mesopotamia
AS.130.300 (01)

A survey of the history of Sumer, Babylonia, and Assyria.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 2:00PM - 4:30PM
  • Instructor: Delnero, Paul
  • Room: Gilman 130G
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Space Archaeology: An Introduction to Satellite Remote Sensing, GIS and GPS
AS.130.353 (01)

This course introduces technologies archaeologists use to map ancient landscapes. These include Geographic Information Systems (GIS) mapping software, advanced Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, and various types of satellite imagery. Taught together with AS.131.653.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Harrower, Michael James
  • Room: Krieger 108
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Archaeology of Arabia
AS.130.364 (01)

This course examines the archaeology of the Arabian Peninsula from the earliest Paleolithic in the region (c. 1.5 million years ago) through the first few centuries of the Islamic era (c. 1000 AD). We will review basic geology and environmental conditions, examine the development of animal herding and crop cultivating lifeways, and scrutinize the rise of ancient South Arabian complex societies and civilizations. Co-listed with AS.131.664.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Harrower, Michael James
  • Room: Gilman 119
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): ISLM-ISLMST, ARCH-ARCH

Elementary Sumerian
AS.130.388 (01)

An introduction to the paleography, grammar and lexicon of the Sumerian language, and the reading of simpler texts in that language.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Chapin, Michael A
  • Room: MSE Library Eisenberg
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Ancient Egypt /Africa
AS.130.328 (01)

Recent excavation and research have shed light on several ancient cultures of the Nile and its tributaries. We will look at the available archaeological and textual (all Egyptian) evidence for these societies and their interactions with Egypt between 3500 and 300 B.C. We will also discuss research aims and methods employed now and in the past in Egypt and the Sudan.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Bryan, Betsy Morrell
  • Room: Gilman 130G
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/19
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial Analysis
AS.270.205 (01)

The course provides a broad introduction to the principles and practice of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and related tools of Geospatial Analysis. Topics will include history of GIS, GIS data structures, data acquisition and merging, database management, spatial analysis, and GIS applications. In addition, students will get hands-on experience working with GIS software.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Chen, Xin
  • Room: Krieger 108
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/25
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SCI, ARCH-RELATE, ENVS-MINOR

Elementary Biblical Hebrew
AS.130.440 (01)

Introduction to the grammar, vocabulary, and writing system of biblical Hebrew.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Church, Gregory Paul
  • Room: MSE Library Eisenberg
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.010.319 (01)Medieval Art and Architecture of the Holy LandMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMZchomelidse, NinoGilman 177ISLM-ISLMST, HART-MED
AS.130.138 (01)Jerusalem: The Holy CityTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMandell, Alice HGilman 50NEAS-HISCUL
AS.100.374 (01)Conquest, Conversion, and Language Change in the Middle AgesMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMEl-leithy, TamerGilman 10INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST, ISLM-ISLMST, HIST-MIDEST, HIST-ASIA, HIST-EUROPE
AS.130.101 (01)Ancient Near Eastern CivilizationsTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMSchwartz, Glenn MRemsen Hall 101ARCH-ARCH
AS.130.140 (01)Hebrew Bible / Old TestamentMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMLewis, TheodoreMaryland 202
AS.130.148 (01)Freshman Seminar: The Development of Useful Things: A Comparative Approach to the Study of Technology and Economy in the Ancient WorldW 1:30PM - 4:00PMDumitru, Ioana AndradaMattin Center 162NEAS-ARTARC, ARCH-ARCH
AS.130.139 (01)Stargazing and Reading the Future: Science and Magic in Ancient EgyptTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMZhang, LingxinShaffer 100NEAS-HISCUL
AS.010.307 (01)Diplomats, Dealers, and Diggers: The Birth of Archaeology and the Rise of Collecting from the 19th c. to TodayMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMFeldman, MarianGilman 119ARCH-ARCH
AS.010.112 (01)Freshman Seminar - Lower, Later, Farther Away: Roman Art Beyond the CenterTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMBevis, Elizabeth AllisonGilman 208
AS.130.147 (01)What My Soul Said To MeTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMWaller, Jill SGilman 134NEAS-ARTARC
AS.130.216 (01)History of the Jews in Modern Times, from the Middle Ages to 1917TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMKatz, DavidSmokler Center LibraryINST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.130.219 (01)The Art of War and Peace in Ancient MesopotamiaMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMTaylor, Avary KathrynGilman 277NEAS-ARTARC, ARCH-ARCH
AS.130.300 (01)History of Ancient MesopotamiaT 2:00PM - 4:30PMDelnero, PaulGilman 130G
AS.130.353 (01)Space Archaeology: An Introduction to Satellite Remote Sensing, GIS and GPSTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMHarrower, Michael JamesKrieger 108ARCH-ARCH
AS.130.364 (01)Archaeology of ArabiaTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMHarrower, Michael JamesGilman 119ISLM-ISLMST, ARCH-ARCH
AS.130.388 (01)Elementary SumerianTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMChapin, Michael AMSE Library Eisenberg
AS.130.328 (01)Ancient Egypt /AfricaMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMBryan, Betsy MorrellGilman 130GARCH-ARCH
AS.270.205 (01)Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial AnalysisM 1:30PM - 4:00PMChen, XinKrieger 108GECS-SCI, ARCH-RELATE, ENVS-MINOR
AS.130.440 (01)Elementary Biblical HebrewMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMChurch, Gregory PaulMSE Library Eisenberg

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

World Prehistory: An Anthropological Perspective
AS.130.177 (01)

How and why did our nomadic hunting and gathering ancestors become farmers? What led agricultural societies to build cities, develop writing, religious institutions, wage war, and trade for exotic goods? This course surveys prehistory and ancient history from the origins of human culture to the emergence civilization. Although prehistory and ancient history yield evidence of tremendous cultural diversity this course emphasizes common elements of past human experience, culture, and culture change. These include the origins of modern humans and their adjustment to a variety of post-ice age environments, shifts from hunting and gathering to agricultural lifeways, and the initial development of the world’s earliest cities and civilizations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Harrower, Michael James
  • Room: Gilman 55
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/40
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH, GECS-SOCSCI

Classics Research Lab: Antioch Recovery Project (ARP)
AS.010.444 (01)

Antioch Recovery Project investigates mosaics from the ancient city of Antioch (modern Antakya, Turkey, near the border with Syria) now in the collection of the Baltimore Museum of Art. Excavated by an international team of archaeologists in the 1930s, hundreds of ancient mosaics from the cosmopolitan city were subsequently dispersed to museums across the globe, with twenty-four mosaics entering the collection of the BMA. Phase I will focus on the digital documentation and analysis of the mosaic of Narcissus as a prototype for ongoing research bringing together the fragments of ancient Antioch for contemporary beholders. The Greek myth of Narcissus tells the story of a beautiful Theban hunter doomed to love his own reflection and is the origin of the modern psychiatric term “narcissism”. Researching the mythology, materials, conservation history, archival material, historiography, and contemporary reception of the Narcissus mosaic and myth offers extensive opportunities to collaborate with scholars across a range of disciplines at JHU, in the Baltimore museum community, and beyond. Investigators will move between the Baltimore Museum of Art, the CRL processing lab in Gilman Hall, and Special Collections. The course will involve some travel to visit other mosaics from Antioch now in collections at Harvard’s Dumbarton Oaks in Washington D.C., and the Princeton Art Museum in Princeton, New Jersey.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Stager, Jennifer M S
  • Room: Gilman 261
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC, ARCH-ARCH

Art of the Assyrian Empire, 1000-600 BCE
AS.010.315 (01)

From 900 to 609 BCE, the Assyrian Empire dominated the ancient Near Eastern world, stretching from western Iran to the Mediterranean and Egypt. In concert with imperial expansion came an explosion of artistic production ranging from palace wall reliefs to small-scale luxury objects. This course provides an integrated picture of the imperial arts of this first world empire, situating it within the broader social and political contexts of the first millennium BCE. In its conquest of foreign lands, this powerful state came in contact with and appropriated a diversity of cultures, such as Phoenicia, Egypt, and Greece, which we will also study.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Feldman, Marian
  • Room: Gilman 177
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/18
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC, ARCH-ARCH

Language and Society
AS.130.218 (01)

We all use language every day—not just to communicate information, but to communicate who we are. How does this work? What do our language choices tell others about us? This course will consider some of the ways in which language and society are entangled—both the ways that different social categories are encoded in language, and the ways that groups of people use language to define themselves. Along the way, the course will address questions of dialect, diglossia, multilingualism, style, language planning, politeness, language and gender, language and power, and more. This course is designed for students without a background in linguistics. During the semester students will learn the basic research methods used by sociolinguists, then complete a project on a topic of their choosing.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Medill, Kathryn Anne
  • Room: Maryland 104
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): COGS-LING

History of the Jews in Modern Times, from the Middle Ages to 1917
AS.130.216 (01)

A broad survey of the significant political and cultural dynamics of Jewish history in the Medieval, Early-Modern, and Modern Eras.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Katz, David
  • Room: Smokler Center Library
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-HISCUL, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

The Origins of Civilization: A Cross-Cultural Perspective
AS.130.214 (01)

One of the most significant transformations in human history was the “urban revolution” in which cities, writing, and social classes formed for the first time. In this course, we compare five areas where this development occurred: China, Mesopotamia, the Indus Valley, Egypt, and Mesoamerica (Mexico/Guatemala/Honduras/Belize). In each region, we review the physical setting, the archaeological and textual evidence, and the theories advanced to explain the rise (and eventual collapse) of these complex societies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Schwartz, Glenn M
  • Room: Shaffer 300
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 39/50
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH, NEAS-ARTARC, NEAS-HISCUL

Introduction to the History of Rabbinic Literature
AS.130.346 (01)

Broadly surveying classic rabbinic literature, including the Talmud and its commentaries, the legal codes and the response, this seminar explores the immanent as well as the external factors that shaped the development of this literature, the seminal role of this literature in Jewish self-definition and self-perception, and the role of this literature in pre-modern and modern Jewish culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Katz, David
  • Room: Smokler Center Library
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Gods and Monsters in Ancient Egypt
AS.130.126 (01)

A basic introduction to Egyptian Religion, with a special focus on the nature of the gods and how humans interact with them. We will devote particular time to the Book of the Dead and to the "magical" aspects of religion designed for protective purposes.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Jasnow, Richard
  • Room: Olin 305
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/100
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-RELATE

Archaeology of Africa: From Human Origins to the Emergence of Civilizations
AS.130.203 (01)

This course examines Africa’s ancient past from the emergence of biologically modern humans, ancient hunter-gatherers, the earliest animal herding and farming populations, to cities and civilizations. While Egypt plays an undeniably central role in world history, this course concentrates in particular on ancient geographies other than Egypt.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Harrower, Michael James
  • Room: Gilman 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH, NEAS-ARTARC

History of Mesopotamia II
AS.130.382 (01)

A survey of the history of Sumer, Babylonia, and Assyria.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 2:00PM - 4:30PM
  • Instructor: Lauinger, Jacob
  • Room: Gilman 130G
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elementary Sumerian II
AS.130.389 (01)

An introduction to the paleography,, grammar and lexicon of the Sumerian language and the reading of simpler texts in that language.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Chapin, Michael A
  • Room: MSE Library Eisenberg
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/10
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-HISCUL

Introduction To Middle Egyptian
AS.130.401 (01)

Introduction to the grammar and writing system of the classical language of the Egyptian Middle Kingdom (ca. 2011- 1700 B.C.). Co-listed with AS.133.601.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Zhang, Lingxin
  • Room: MSE Library Eisenberg
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elementary Biblical Hebrew
AS.130.441 (01)

Survey of grammar and reading of simple texts. (Credit given only on completion of AS.130.440 and AS.130.441). May not be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Church, Gregory Paul
  • Room: MSE Library Eisenberg
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Reading Of Hebrew Prose
AS.130.443 (01)

Reading of Biblical Hebrew prose, especially from the Pentateuch, Joshua, Judges, Samuel, and Kings.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Church, Gregory Paul
  • Room: MSE Library Eisenberg
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction To Archaeology
AS.136.101 (01)

An introduction to archaeology and to archaeological method and theory, exploring how archaeologists excavate, analyze, and interpret ancient remains in order to reconstruct how ancient societies functioned. Specific examples from a variety of archaeological projects in different parts of the world will be used to illustrate techniques and principles discussed.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Anderson, Emily S.K.
  • Room: Shaffer 100
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/50
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial Analysis
AS.270.205 (01)

The course provides a broad introduction to the principles and practice of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and related tools of Geospatial Analysis. Topics will include history of GIS, GIS data structures, data acquisition and merging, database management, spatial analysis, and GIS applications. In addition, students will get hands-on experience working with GIS software.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Kelly, Rebecca E
  • Room: Krieger 108
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/24
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-RELATE, ENVS-MINOR

The Book of Ezekiel
AS.134.408 (01)

A rapid reading course aimed at increasing proficiency in reading the Hebrew text of the book of Ezekiel. Various aspects of translation and interpretation will be studied (e.g., grammar, textual criticism, Philology) including literary, historical, and theological questions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Lewis, Theodore
  • Room: Gilman 130G
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/10
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-HISCUL

Seminar in Research Methods in Near Eastern Studies: Religion and Science
AS.130.420 (01)

This writing intensive seminar examines the relationship between religion and science in ancient Mesopotamia and the rest of the Near East from the 4th millennium to the Hellenistic period. Using a variety of case studies, and through engagement with scholarly literature pertaining to the topic of the course, students will develop skills in specific research skills such as critical reading, analysis, and interpretation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 2:00PM - 4:30PM
  • Instructor: Delnero, Paul
  • Room: Gilman 130G
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-RELATE

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.130.177 (01)World Prehistory: An Anthropological PerspectiveTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMHarrower, Michael JamesGilman 55ARCH-ARCH, GECS-SOCSCI
AS.010.444 (01)Classics Research Lab: Antioch Recovery Project (ARP)Th 3:00PM - 5:30PMStager, Jennifer M SGilman 261HART-ANC, ARCH-ARCH
AS.010.315 (01)Art of the Assyrian Empire, 1000-600 BCEMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMFeldman, MarianGilman 177HART-ANC, ARCH-ARCH
AS.130.218 (01)Language and SocietyTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMMedill, Kathryn AnneMaryland 104COGS-LING
AS.130.216 (01)History of the Jews in Modern Times, from the Middle Ages to 1917TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKatz, DavidSmokler Center LibraryNEAS-HISCUL, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.130.214 (01)The Origins of Civilization: A Cross-Cultural PerspectiveTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMSchwartz, Glenn MShaffer 300ARCH-ARCH, NEAS-ARTARC, NEAS-HISCUL
AS.130.346 (01)Introduction to the History of Rabbinic LiteratureTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMKatz, DavidSmokler Center Library
AS.130.126 (01)Gods and Monsters in Ancient EgyptMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMJasnow, RichardOlin 305ARCH-RELATE
AS.130.203 (01)Archaeology of Africa: From Human Origins to the Emergence of CivilizationsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMHarrower, Michael JamesGilman 17ARCH-ARCH, NEAS-ARTARC
AS.130.382 (01)History of Mesopotamia IIF 2:00PM - 4:30PMLauinger, JacobGilman 130G
AS.130.389 (01)Elementary Sumerian IITh 1:30PM - 4:00PMChapin, Michael AMSE Library EisenbergNEAS-HISCUL
AS.130.401 (01)Introduction To Middle EgyptianMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMZhang, LingxinMSE Library Eisenberg
AS.130.441 (01)Elementary Biblical HebrewChurch, Gregory PaulMSE Library Eisenberg
AS.130.443 (01)Reading Of Hebrew ProseM 1:30PM - 4:00PMChurch, Gregory PaulMSE Library Eisenberg
AS.136.101 (01)Introduction To ArchaeologyMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMAnderson, Emily S.K.Shaffer 100ARCH-ARCH
AS.270.205 (01)Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial AnalysisMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMKelly, Rebecca EKrieger 108ARCH-RELATE, ENVS-MINOR
AS.134.408 (01)The Book of EzekielT 3:00PM - 5:30PMLewis, TheodoreGilman 130GNEAS-HISCUL
AS.130.420 (01)Seminar in Research Methods in Near Eastern Studies: Religion and ScienceW 2:00PM - 4:30PMDelnero, PaulGilman 130GARCH-RELATE