Undergraduate Courses

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

The Stone and the Thread
AS.010.389 (01)

Advanced inquiry into imperial Inka architecture and fiber arts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Deleonardis, Lisa
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/25
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC, ARCH-ARCH

Pyramids, Temples and Tombs
AS.130.135 (01)

Introduction to the monuments and culture of Egypt from 3500 B.C. to 100 A.D. From the pyramids at Giza to Hellenistic Alexandria, this course surveys in slide illustrated lectures the remains of one of the world’s greatest early cultures.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Bryan, Betsy Morrell
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/65
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Diplomacy and Conflict in the Ancient Middle East
AS.130.170 (01)

The Middle East is home to the invention of agriculture, cities, and writing. It is also in the Middle East that we find evidence of humanity’s earliest diplomatic activity in, for instance, the actual letters sent by ancient kings to one another, the treaties drawn up after their conflicts, and the inscriptions that commemorate their conquests. In this course, we examine texts such as these to explore questions such as: How do we characterize the international system of the ancient Middle East? Does this system change over the approximately two millennia for which we have documentation? Is it better to approach ancient diplomacy through present-day eyes or in the context of ancient world-views? Is an understanding of diplomacy in the ancient Middle East relevant to our understanding of modern international relations? All texts read in translation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Lauinger, Jacob
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

The Origins of Civilization: A Cross-Cultural Perspective
AS.130.214 (01)

One of the most significant transformations in human history was the “urban revolution” in which cities, writing, and social classes formed for the first time. In this course, we compare five areas where this development occurred: China, Mesopotamia, the Indus Valley, Egypt, and Mesoamerica (Mexico/Guatemala/Honduras/Belize). In each region, we review the physical setting, the archaeological and textual evidence, and the theories advanced to explain the rise (and eventual collapse) of these complex societies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Schwartz, Glenn M
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 25/50
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH, NEAS-ARTARC, NEAS-HISCUL

History of the Jews in Pre-Modern Times, from the Middle Ages to 1789
AS.130.216 (01)

A broad survey of the significant political and cultural dynamics of Jewish history in the Medieval, Early-Modern, and Modern Eras.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Katz, David
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-HISCUL, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

Law, Ritual, and Society: The Making of Biblical Israel
AS.130.221 (01)

Stories of conflict over religion and law proliferate in contemporary American news media. Perhaps even more frequent in recent years are the stories from the Middle East concerning attempts at using law to advance a particular religious agenda. Such patterns are ubiquitous throughout human history. While the circumstances and details vary, law and ritual always shape human societies in remarkable ways. In this course, we will examine the ways in which societies utilize law and ritual to shape social values, customs, and perspectives. We will study law and ritual not simply as cultural artifacts, but as ideological tools used by individuals and groups to advance agendas, compel behaviors, and otherwise influence such social forces as power, status, gender, and resources. We will use ancient Israel as our test case. The texts of the Hebrew Bible offer us a view into a long history of focus on both law and ritual within one society. These texts were preserved because they were socially useful in a variety of contexts. Yet, the long history of legal and ritual texts in the Hebrew Bible also gives us insight into how such traditions evolve and change in different social conditions. While law and ritual may shape society, they are likewise often shaped by it. Students should be able to take these broad considerations from ancient Israel and apply them to other social settings in both discussion and writing by the end of this course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Church, Gregory Paul
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/18
  • PosTag(s): NEAS-HISCUL

Introduction to the History of Rabbinic Literature
AS.130.346 (01)

Broadly surveying classic rabbinic literature, including the Talmud and its commentaries, the legal codes and the response, this seminar explores the immanent as well as the external factors that shaped the development of this literature, the seminal role of this literature in Jewish self-definition and self-perception, and the role of this literature in pre-modern and modern Jewish culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Katz, David
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Archaeological Method and Theory
AS.130.354 (01)

Climate change, population growth, war - what questions do archaeologists ask about the ancient past, how do they collect relevant evidence, and how do they arrive at satisfying answers to their questions? This course will review major theoretical currents in archaeology including evolutionary, cultural-historical, processual and post-processual approaches and discuss the future of archaeology as a scientific and humanistic discipline. Basic techniques for analyzing major categories of artifacts such as lithics, ceramics, archaeobotanical, and zooarchaeological materials will also be introduced.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Harrower, Michael James
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Geographic Information Systems in Archaeology
AS.130.357 (01)

Applications of GIS in archaeology have recently expanded dramatically and GIS has now become an indispensable tool for archaeological research worldwide. This course will introduce the major applications of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in archaeology. These include the history of GIS in archaeology, air photography and satellite imagery, predictive modeling, hydrological modeling, viewsheds, and least-cost routes. It will grapple with theoretical issues manifest in archaeological GIS including conflicts between environment and social understandings of the ancient past, and will foster discussion of issues that affect outcomes of analyses including spatial scale and boundary delineation choices that can dramatically influence results. Students will learn the basics of ESRI’s ArcGIS software. Taught with AS.131.657.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Harrower, Michael James
  • Room: Krieger 108
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/7
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Prophets and Prophecy in the Bible
AS.130.373 (01)

From thundering voices of social justice to apocalyptic visionaries, biblical prophets have been revered by Jews, Christians and Muslims for thousands of years. They have inspired civic leaders such as Martin Luther King Jr. yet also provided fodder for modern charlatans promising a utopian future. Yet who were these individuals (orators? politicians? diviners? poets?) and what was the full range of their message as set against the Realpolitik world of ancient Israel, Iraq, Egypt, Syria and Jordan?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Lewis, Theodore
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction To Middle Egyptian
AS.130.401 (01)

Introduction to the grammar and writing system of the classical language of the Egyptian Middle Kingdom (ca. 2011- 1700 B.C.). Co-listed with AS.133.601.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Zhang, Lingxin
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Seminar in Research Methods in Near Eastern Studies: Investigating Gender and Sexuality in Mesopotamian Art
AS.130.420 (01)

This writing intensive seminar examines how artistic products expressed and constructed gender identities and notions of sexuality in ancient Mesopotamia from the 4th millennium to the Hellenistic period. Using a variety of case studies, students will develop skills in specific research areas such as critical reading, analysis, and interpretation that will lead to a final research paper.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Feldman, Marian
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/6
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Elementary Biblical Hebrew
AS.130.441 (01)

Survey of grammar and reading of simple texts. May not be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Weimar, Jason Everett
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Reading Of Hebrew Prose
AS.130.443 (01)

Reading of Biblical Hebrew Prose, from texts such as the Pentateuch, Joshua, Judges, Samuel, and Kings.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Weimar, Jason Everett
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial Analysis
AS.270.205 (01)

The course provides a broad introduction to the principles and practice of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and related tools of Geospatial Analysis. Topics will include history of GIS, GIS data structures, data acquisition and merging, database management, spatial analysis, and GIS applications. In addition, students will get hands-on experience working with GIS software.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Kelly, Rebecca E
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/24
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-RELATE, ENVS-MINOR

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.010.389 (01)The Stone and the ThreadTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMDeleonardis, LisaHodson 110HART-ANC, ARCH-ARCH
AS.130.135 (01)Pyramids, Temples and TombsMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMBryan, Betsy MorrellRemsen Hall 1ARCH-ARCH
AS.130.170 (01)Diplomacy and Conflict in the Ancient Middle EastTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMLauinger, Jacob INST-GLOBAL
AS.130.214 (01)The Origins of Civilization: A Cross-Cultural PerspectiveTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMSchwartz, Glenn M ARCH-ARCH, NEAS-ARTARC, NEAS-HISCUL
AS.130.216 (01)History of the Jews in Pre-Modern Times, from the Middle Ages to 1789TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKatz, David NEAS-HISCUL, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.130.221 (01)Law, Ritual, and Society: The Making of Biblical IsraelWF 1:30PM - 2:45PMChurch, Gregory Paul NEAS-HISCUL
AS.130.346 (01)Introduction to the History of Rabbinic LiteratureTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMKatz, David 
AS.130.354 (01)Archaeological Method and TheoryTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMHarrower, Michael James ARCH-ARCH
AS.130.357 (01)Geographic Information Systems in ArchaeologyTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMHarrower, Michael JamesKrieger 108ARCH-ARCH
AS.130.373 (01)Prophets and Prophecy in the BibleTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMLewis, Theodore 
AS.130.401 (01)Introduction To Middle EgyptianMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMZhang, Lingxin 
AS.130.420 (01)Seminar in Research Methods in Near Eastern Studies: Investigating Gender and Sexuality in Mesopotamian ArtW 1:30PM - 4:00PMFeldman, Marian ARCH-ARCH
AS.130.441 (01)Elementary Biblical HebrewMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMWeimar, Jason Everett 
AS.130.443 (01)Reading Of Hebrew ProseMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMWeimar, Jason Everett 
AS.270.205 (01)Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial AnalysisMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMKelly, Rebecca E ARCH-RELATE, ENVS-MINOR